Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Academic advising
Guidance offered to students regarding program requirements and employment opportunities; academic planning for a student’s educational path, graduation eligibility, course equivalencies, and opportunities available at other postsecondary institutions.

Academic Council (AC)
College body which provides academic leadership, establishes academic policy, approves program curriculum.

Academic Leadership Team (ALT)
Team of senior academic leaders reporting to the Vice President Academic (VPA). Includes academic support services such as the Registrar, Chief Information Officer, Director of Institutional Research and Learning Resources, and Dean of Students. Responsible for implementation of the academic plan, strategic decision-making related to education programs, budgeting and resources, teaching resource planning, educational facilities and integrated enrolment planning. Chaired by the Vice President Academic.

Academic level
Level of academic rigor for courses (e.g., first-year, second-year, third-year, graduate).

Academic year
Begins in September and ends in August.

Accreditation
Official recognition of achievement; usually from an external professional body.

Active course
The course status used for courses that are currently offered.

Active program
The program status used for programs offered at in the current academic year.

Admission requirements
The prior education a student needs in order to be admitted to a program. The basic admission requirement for postsecondary programs is an OSSD or equivalent with Grade 12 English (C or U). Degree programs require an OSSD or equivalent with minimum overall average of 65% including six Grade 12 U or M level courses and Grade 12 English (U level). Graduate certificate programs require a postsecondary diploma or degree. Additional program specific requirements are found in the program outline and the admissions program guide.

Advanced standing
The registration status given to a student that allows entry to a program at a level higher than semester one, based on previous documented academic work at another institution.

Alternative delivery
Delivery that provides students with option(s) for learning that are not limited to traditionally timetabled classroom hours covering a standard term, options for learning that have “time and/or location” flexibility.

Ancillary fees
Fees charged to support services and activities distinct from academic programming or general overhead for the institution. Examples of ancillary fees include convocation fees, student activity fees, athletic fees, health care and insurance fees, field trip fees and fees associated with the cost of buildings such as student centres. See also Compulsory ancillary fees.

Anti-requisite
Courses that are similar enough in content and expectations that only one of the courses can be used to meet graduation requirements.

APA
American Psychological Association documentation style for formatting papers, in-text citations, and documenting sources.

Apprenticeship placement 
An apprenticeship placement involves practical and paid on the job training provided by a skilled worker, or trainer. The Curriculum Standards are developed by the Ontario College of Trades in consultation with representatives from the trade and Training Delivery Agent instructors. The standards have been designed to support consistency and accountability within the in-school training process; ensuring apprentices across Ontario are developing the skills necessary for success in his/her trade.

Apprenticeship program
Programs structured to provide students with both classroom learning and paid on-the-job experience in a skilled trade.

Approved course
A course that has been approved for delivery.

Approved program
Program that has been approved by the Ministry; approval makes the program eligible for operating grant funding, federal government direct purchase or apprenticeship funding, and authorizes the awarding of certificates, diplomas and degrees to graduates of the program (Ministry).

APS number
Approved Program Sequence: Five-digit number unique to a college, assigned to an approved program by the Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS).

Articulation agreement
Agreement with other educational institution(s) for facilitating transfer of academic credits specific process and documentation required.

Audit year
The Ministry’s enrolment and graduation audit year for funding purposes runs April 1st to March 31st. The audit year is the same as Georgian’s fiscal year. Full-time semester audit dates are as follows: Fall – November 1st, Winter – March 1st, and Summer – June 30th. The part-time audit is run once per year, at the end of the audit year.

B

Banner
The Student Information System (SIS) housing admission, registration, and graduation records of all students

Base funding
Formerly “General Purpose Operating Grant (GPOG)”: Portion of the provincial operating grant for colleges that is distributed among colleges on the basis of each college’s historical average enrolment in courses and programs of instruction eligible for funding.

Basic postsecondary program
Conforms to the levels of learning articulated in the Credentials Framework and leads to the awarding of one of the following credentials: Ontario College Certificate, Ontario College Diploma, Ontario College Advanced Diploma, or Honours Degree. Also includes joint college-university programs that lead to the awarding of a degree by the university partner.

Board of Governors
As directed by the Ministry, all provincially funded Ontario colleges are governed by a Board of Governors. The Board is responsible for the overall governance of the College in compliance with applicable legislation, regulation and provincial government policy and direction. Additionally, they are accountable for setting the strategic direction of the college. Board of Governors Policies.

Booklist
List of required resources for courses offered in a term; generated by academic area, ordered by Bookstore, provided for student information for purchase.

Breadth courses
Courses outside of the main discipline of the degree.

C

Calendar year
January to December; distinguished from academic year, financial year and audit year.

Cancelled program
A program that is no longer offered, and in which no students are enrolled. To reinstate a cancelled program, follow the New Program Development process.

Career opportunities
Entry-level positions for which a graduate of a program has been prepared, appears on the program outline.

CAT
See CourseLeaf Catalogue (CAT).

Centre for Teaching and Learning
Georigan department; facilitates academic professional development (PD) with emphasis on the quality of the student learning experience and support for those experiences both in and outside the classroom.

Certificate
Document of recognition awarded by a college Board of Governors to a student who has successfully completed a program of less than four terms or the equivalent; includes full-time and part-time studies.

Certificate program
Local Board approved program comprised of approximately 4 – 6 post-secondary level courses; receives part-time Ministry funding only. Applicants are required to meet the same admission requirements as the Ministry approved program from which the certificate is associated with. Provides an additional pathway into future post-secondary studies, or an early exit point for students unable to complete a full program. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded a Certificate from Georgian.

CIM
See CourseLeaf Curriculum (CIM).

Cites and Sources
The Georgian College student and faculty guidebook for documentation style.

Class
Used in several ways: Group of students enrolled in a program who follow “basically ” the same schedule; a group of students in one section of a course.

Classroom
Instruction in a setting in which individual students do not require access to equipment, except computers for software packages. Includes traditional “classrooms” and lecture halls, and when labs and workshops are used for convenience.

Clinical placement
One of several types of practical experience components, provides hands-on experience in a hospital or health care setting with exposure to a range of tasks expected of a graduate.

CLOs
See Course Learning Outcomes.

Cohort
Group of students entering and travelling through a program of study together.

Collaborative program
A concurrent program where students are studying simultaneously at both a college and university during an academic year or a joint/integrated program where students are taking the program sequentially at one institution and then the other.

College Council
College committee: President’s advisory committee; confers highest level of approval for matters requiring Board of Governors’ approval.

College Placement Assessment (CPA)
Administered to incoming first year students to assess skills in Communications.

College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP)
The CQAAP is an institutional level process overseen by the Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS) that involves the regular and cyclical review of each college’s quality assurance mechanisms. The standards provide the framework for Ontario’s colleges in assessing the extent to which their quality assurance mechanisms meet the established standards. Its purpose is developmental and its intent is to ensure continual improvement.

Compulsory ancillary fees
Fees that a student is required to pay to enrol in or successfully complete any course or program of instruction. There are two types of compulsory ancillary fees: program ancillary fees which are compulsory for students in applicable programs; and institutional ancillary fees which are compulsory for all students.

Concurrent requisite
A course that must be taken prior to or at the same time as another course.

Co-op
One of the several types of practical experience components in Georgian College programs. Specifically, enhancement of program of study by providing opportunity to complement academic studies through substantial work experience, alternating with periods of time spent in school. For a program to be considered co-op, the work term component(s) must be a minimum of 30% of the academic hours. Appears as a category on program outlines.

Co-ordinators
Faculty who in addition to their teaching responsibilities provide academic leadership in the co-ordination of courses and/or programs.

Core courses
Courses in a degree that are within the main discipline of the degree; may be mandatory or elective for the program.

Corequisite
A course which must be taken simultaneously with another course. Note: If the co-requisite course is passed, but the course that it is co-requisite to is failed, BOTH courses must be repeated.

Corporate contract
A contract with an outside organization to conduct training completed in specified time period to accomplish specific learning outcomes. Organizations could include hospitals, army base, municipalities, associations or non-profits.

Course
A subject offered either as part of a program or on a standalone basis, can be made up of modules. Courses represent the organization of learning outcomes into the smallest package of related activities for tracking and delivery purposes.

Course attribute
A component of the course outline, used to identify areas where students have choice (eg. General Education courses).

Course code
Unique identifier for courses consisting of four alpha characters followed by four numbers. The four place alpha prefix identifies the subject area; the first place of the numeric identifier denotes level of study (e.g., Year 1, Year 2, etc.).

Course content
A list of generic topics within the course that relate to the course learning outcomes. Course content appears in the course outline.

Course description
A concise, general description of the course which can broadly include content and goals. It should be general enough to allow for changes in trends and technology over time, but specific enough to reflect content and learning outcomes. Component of both course and program outlines.

Course funding types
Ministry categories used for funding purposes and represented by two-digit numbers for reporting purposes. The categories and corresponding numbers are as follows: postsecondary (40), special approval funded credit and non-credit (60), non-funded non-credit (70), pending special approval designation (80). Further, the special approval and pending approval categories have sub-types of postsecondary electives (31), occupational certification (32), other vocational (33), basic communication/numeric skills (34), and miscellaneous (35).

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)
Clear statements that define and clarify the level and quality of performance required by students in a specific course. Learning Outcomes must be specific, attainable, measurable, and learner-centred, and they should identify the knowledge and skills that students are able to demonstrate by the end of a course or program. CLOs appear on course outlines.

Course offerings
Courses offered to students within a program in a particular semester, year of study, or term.

Course outline
A contract between the college and students describing what learning students are able to demonstrate by the end of a course, as well as topics covered throughout the course, and how they are to be evaluated.

Course registration number (CRN)
A unique number for a course section in the Banner student information system in which students register.

Course selection
A registration process whereby students identify courses for study in a term or academic year.

Course title – full
Distinguishable from other course titles at Georgian; decipherable to a wide audience; 100-character limit; appears on official documents such as the program outline.

Course title – short
Distinguishable from other course titles at Georgian; decipherable to a wide audience; 30 character limit; appears on timetables, grade reports/transcripts, college website.

Course type
Courses are either postsecondary credit courses (attached to postsecondary programs regardless of delivery) or Part-time Studies courses (non-credit and special approval).

CourseLeaf
Academic course and program management software.

CourseLeaf Catalogue (CAT)
Catalogue module of CourseLeaf used to manage program data and academic policies that are typically displayed in the college calendar.

CourseLeaf Curriculum (CIM)
Curriculum information management module of CourseLeaf used to manage course and program approval processes and data entry. The CourseLeaf Curriculum and CourseLeaf Catalog modules work together to automatically update all catalogues with approved course, program and student information system (Banner) data.

CPA
See College Placement Assessment.

CQAAP
See College Quality Assurance Audit Process.

Credential
A qualification or achievement awarded in the form of a document upon successful completion of a program of instruction in the college system; consistent with Ministry’s Credentials Framework.

Credential Validation Service (CVS)
One of the services offered through Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS) to ensure standard quality programs across the Ontario college system.

Credentials framework
Document that describes the level of learning that occurs across the various program types delivered in Ontario postsecondary institutions. Contained within the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive – Framework for Program’s of Instruction, and found at Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU).

Credit course
Course which meets postsecondary program requirements regardless of delivery.

Credit transfer
Opportunity to gain credit/exemption/PLAR/transfer through advanced standing. See also Credit Transfer Centre.

Credit value
The number of credits given to a course and used in semester and program weighted average calculations. The credit value is determined based on the total course hours divided by the college standard number of weeks per term (e.g., a 42-hour course will have a credit value of three based on the standard college semester length of 14 weeks).

CRN
See Course registration number.

Curriculum
Used broadly to encompass the dynamic totality of student learning; often refers to the program components as a whole; and is used to refer to individual components, such as courses.

Curriculum development
Process of designing and/or renewing learning activities and requirements in programs and/or courses.

Curriculum review process
The ongoing review of programs and courses to ensure industry relevance; may result in the need for curriculum changes prior to the formal program renewal process for a given program.

CVS
See Credential Validation Services.

D

Degree audit
See Graduate audit.

DegreeWorks
DegreeWorks is a comprehensive academic advising and degree evaluation tool that works with the Banner student information system to guide students and advisors as students progress through their programs of study.

Delivery mode
Method of delivering a program or course, examples include: Lecture, lab, online, blended, compressed, correspondence, independent study, videoconferencing.

Diploma
Credential granted upon successful completion of a two or three year program.

Direct entry
Students entering postsecondary directly from high school.

Dormant program/course
An approved program or special approval course, which has not had any activity in a 5-year period, i.e. there has been no enrolment in the program/course.

E

EES
See Essential Employability Skills.

Effective date
The effective term (course) or year (program) that the new or changed curriculum comes into effect. For courses, the effective date is represented by the term (e.g., Fall/Winter/Summer) plus the year (e.g., 2017); for programs, the effective date is represented by the academic year (e.g., 2017-18).

Elective core courses
Courses in a degree program from which a student must choose that are within the main discipline of the degree. Appears as a category on program outlines.

Elective courses
Courses in certificate and diploma programs from which a student must choose; may include general education courses or courses that provide a degree of vocational specialization. Appears as a category on program outlines.

Elective non-core courses
Courses in a degree program from which a student must choose that are outside of the main discipline of the degree. Appears as a category on program outlines.

Equivalent course
An internal college course equal in curriculum to another Georgian College course; must satisfy 80% of the course learning outcomes; course hours can vary. Equivalent courses can be as follows: one-way (eg. an upper level course equivalent to a lower level course but not the other way around), two-way (both courses are equivalent to each other), multiple courses to one (two or more courses satisfy the outcomes on one course), one course to multiple courses (one course satisfies the outcomes of two or more courses). Differs from exemptions as it applies to internal Georgian courses only.

Essential Employability Skills (EES)
Particular life skills essential for both personal and career success in the areas of communications, mathematics, information management, interpersonal, personal, and critical thinking and problem-solving. Required in certificate, diploma, and advanced diploma programs. See also Ontario Essential employability skills.

Evaluation method
Component of the course outline identifying categories by which the student will be evaluatied.

Exemption
The use of a credit course from another postsecondary institution deemed to satisfy a course requirement in a Georgian program; exemptions are granted on an individual basis; the transcript shows “EX” and no course mark. Differs from equivalent courses as it applies to courses from other institutions only; not used for Georgian to Georgian course equivalencies.

F

Fee payers
Students who pay tuition fees for the Ministry approved programs in which they enroll.

Field placement
One of the several types of practical experience components in Georgian College programs; specifically, work exposure to full range of tasks or skills expected of a competent graduate. Appears as a category on program outlines.

Fiscal year
April 1 to March 31; same as audit year for Ministry reports on student enrolment and graduation numbers.

Full cost recovery
A program approved by the Credential Validation Service as meeting the credentials framework, but for which no Ministry funding is provided. Students incur the full cost of the program delivery.

Full-time student
For Ministry funding and tuition assessement purposes: enrolled in at least 70% of the course hours (typically 18 hr/wk) or 66 2/3 % of the program course load (typically 6 courses) for any semester; exempt, audited and courses withdrawn prior to the audit date are not considered in the calculation.

For OSAP purposes: not eligible for OSAP if course load is less than 60%; for special needs students not eligible if course load is less than 40%; minimum of 12 consecutive weeks of study.

G

General education outcomes
Knowledge, skill and attitudinal outcomes that enable learners to meet more effectively the societal challenges that they face in their community, family and working life.

General purpose operating grant
See Base funding.

Grade mode
Component of the course outline identifying how the final grade will appear on the student transcript, either as a percent (%) or pass/fail (P/F).

Grade report
A record of academic achievement which students can view online in the student information system (Banner) at the end of each semester. This is an unofficial record of grades; requests for official transcripts are made through the Office of the Registrar.

Grades
Final assessment for a course given to students and recorded in student history, i.e. on transcript/grade report available through Banner.

Graduate audit
Also referred to as a degree audit, this is a process whereby the Office of the Registrar confirms graduation eligibility in the student information system (Banner). Students must submit a Request to Graduate form in order for the audit to be performed.

Graduation eligibility
Demonstration by a student that program graduation requirements have been met, including residency requirements; determined by the Office of the Registrar by completing a graduate audit against individual student records. Refer to the program outline for program specific graduation requirements, and the academic policies for college specific details.

Graduation requirements
Total number and type of courses required in a program. Includes specific courses by category as listed in the program outline. Categories include but are not limited to mandatory courses, mandatory core courses, mandatory non-core courses, communications, general education, elective courses, elective core courses, elective non-core courses, practicums, field placements, and co-op work terms.

H

High demand program
A program eligible for funding by the Ministry for which colleges have the discretion to charge fees above the maximum permitted for regular fee programs. This discretion is allowed for all degree and post-basic programs. Basic programs are also allowed this discretion, provided they meet each of the following criteria: there is a high demand for instructional spacce, graduates have above average prospects for employment, graduates have the potential to earn an above average income, and the aggregate enrolment in all basic post-secondary programs designated as high demand does not exceed 15% of the basic full-time enrolment at the college.

Honours Baccalaureate/Bachelor’s Degree program
Four your degree programs offer a solid foundation of theoretical knowledge and practical skills to apply this knowledge. Applicants may enter directly from high school if they meet minimum admission requirements of Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent with minimum overall average of 65 percent with six Grade 12 U or M level courses including Grade 12 English (U level); may also have additional program specific requirements. Adheres to the Ontario Qualifications Framework and the college receives Ministry funding. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded an Honours Bachelor’s Degree.

I

Inactive course
A course that is not currently being delivered.

Independent (self- paced) learning
Method of study where student contact with college staff is limited to situations in which advice or solutions to specific problems is sought.

Intake
An offering of a program with a specific start and end date (may be equal to, but not restricted to a term); identifies initial term of a program’s student intake as term + year, i.e. Fall 2017 or Winter 2018.

Interim grades
Mid-term grades communicated to students by teachers; not recorded in the student information system (Banner) or reported on grade reports.

Internship
One of the several types of practical experience components in Georgian College programs. Specifically, hands-on experience generally reserved for advanced students undergoing practical training (e.g. post-graduate program). Appears on program outlines.

J

Joint program
A concurrent program where students are studying simultaneously at both a college and university during an academic year or where students are taking the program sequentially at one institution and then the other. Joint/Collaborative programs are defined as programs that are based on a formal agreement between the participating institutions to either share resources or recognize each other’s credits as part of a cohesive program.

K

Key Performance Indicators (KPI)
Ministry initiative to use feedback from students, graduates and employers to rate the success of college programs.

L

Laboratory
Instructional setting in which students require access to special equipment for learning applications. Scheduled hours of activities intended to give students hands-on experience in a lab or workshop setting.

Letter of permission (LOP)
Students in good standing may apply for a letter of permission to take an equivalent course at another institution in order to meet program graduation requirements if a previously failed course is no longer available. Also see Georgian’s academic policies.

M

MAESD
See Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU).

Major
Four digit unique alpha code assigned by the Office of Academic Quality; component of the program outline; used for admission, registration a nd graduation processes.

Mandatory core courses
Specific courses within the main discipline of a degree level program that must be successfully completed for a student to be eligible for graduation.

Mandatory courses
Specific courses identified in each program that must be successfully completed for a student to be eligible for graduation; mandatory courses represent the minimum “core” of knowledge and skill for the program.

Mandatory non-core courses
Specific courses outside the main discipline of a degree level program that must be successfully completed for a student to be eligible for graduation.

Ministry approved program
A program of instruction approved by the Ministry for funding through the general purpose operating grant leading to one of the following credentials: Ontario College Certificate, Ontario College Diploma, Ontario College Advanced Diploma, Ontario Graduate Certificate, a baccalaureate degree in an applied field of study or joint college/university program that leads to the awarding of a degree by the university partner.

Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU)
The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities is responsible for oversight and governance of the Ontario Postsecondary Education sector including development of policy directions for colleges and universities. MTCU was previously known as the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (MAESD).

MTCU code
The code established by MTCU that identifies the provincial program category into which each postsecondary program has been assigned by the Ministry. The first number of the code denotes credential level: 8 – College Degree, 7 – Graduate Certificate, 6 – Advanced Diploma, 5 – Diploma, 4 – Certificate

N

Nomenclature
Naming convention reflecting agreed upon principles governing the formation and use of specific terms; used in Ministry program standards for titling protocol.

Non-core courses
Also referred to as breadth courses, these courses are outside of the main discipline of the degree. They are designed to give students the tools to develop interdisciplinary perspectives that inform their approach to their own discipline, their continued education and their life outside work. May be mandatory or elective for the program.

O

Ontario College Advanced Diploma program
Applicants enter directly from high school and complete six semesters (three years) of study; minimum admission requirements are Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent with Grade 12 english (C or U level); many programs also have additional program-specific requirements. Adheres to the Ontario Qualifications Framework and the college receives Ministry funding. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded an Ontario College Advanced Diploma.

Ontario College Certificate program
Applicants enter directly from high school and complete two semesters (one year) of study; minimum admission requirements are Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent with Grade 12 english (C or U level); programs may also have additional program-specific requirements. Adheres to the Ontario Qualifications Framework and the college receives Ministry funding. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded an Ontario College Certificate.

Ontario College Diploma program
Applicants enter directly from high school and complete four semesters (two years) of study; minimum admission requirements are Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent with Grade 12 english (C or U level); many programs also have additional program-specific requirements. Adheres to the Ontario Qualifications Framework and the college receives Ministry funding. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded an Ontario College Advanced Diploma.

Ontario College Graduate Certificate program
Ontario college graduate certificate programs require applicants to have a university degree or college diploma for admission, learning builds on knowledge and experience gained through previous post-secondary education. Adheres to the Ontario Qualifications Framework and the college receives Ministry funding. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded an Ontario College Graduate Certificate.

Ontario College Quality Assurance Services (OCQAS)
The Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS) was established to provide efficient tools that ensure specific quality and consistency standards are met by the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology in Ontario. The OCQAS is responsible for ensuring quality at both the program level through the Credential Validation Service (CVS) as well as at the institutional level through the College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP).

Ontario colleges
Ontario colleges is the online application service for all Ontario community colleges, previously known as Ontario College Application Service (OCAS).

Ontario Qualifications Framework (OQF)
Describes the broad learning expectations and skills required of graduates of different credentials; applies to all programs offered under the auspices of the Province of Ontario. Also see, Ontario Qualifications Framework chart.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)
Granted upon satisfactory completion of four years of high school.

Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP)
The Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) provides student assistance through loans and grants on the basis of an established financial need.

OntarioLearn
A partnership consisting of the 24 Ontario community colleges that provides options and convenience through online courses, and promotes quality and excellence for online course design standards.

Optional courses
A list of non-mandatory courses that students can choose from to meet program graduation requirements.

P

Part-time student
Students taking less than 70% of the course hours or 66 2/3 % of the program course load for any semester.

Part-time studies
A term commonly used to describe courses offered during the evening and on weekends through the department of Part-time Studies and Workforce Development; does not describe student status (see part-time student).

Passing grade
Minimum rating for courses is 50%, however a higher grade may be required to obtain credit for graduation purposes. See Georgian’s academic policies.

Pending course
A course status in which the basic elements of a course have been approved and have been entered into the system; completion and approval of remaining course elements are forthcoming.

Pending program
A program status in which a program with Georgian College approval but has not yet received Ministry approval.

PEQAB
See Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board.

PLAR
See Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition.

PLAR challenge process
A method of assessment other than portfolio, developed and evaluated by subject- expert faculty to measure an individual’s learning achievements against course learning outcomes. Measures demonstrated learning though a variety of written and non- written methods, for the purpose of awarding credit without requiring enrolment in a course.

PLAR portfolio
An organized collection of materials developed by a learner which records learning achievements and relates them to personal, educational or occupational goals. Portfolios submitted for assessment for college credit relate recorded learning achievements to learning outcomes of college courses/programs.

PLOs
See Program Learning Outcomes.

Pool
A scheduling mechanism of grouping courses offered for student choice that are delivered at the same time, normally used for General Education and Communication courses.

Postgraduate program
A program designed to provide additional or advanced skills that enhance an existing knowledge base for which a diploma or degree has been awarded, requires Ministry approval ; also referred to as post-basic or post-diploma.

Postsecondary
Any education that occurs after high school.

Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB)
The Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board is an arms-length advisory agency that makes recommendations to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) on applications for ministerial consent to offer applied baccalaureate degree programs under the terms of the Post-secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000. The Board determines the criteria and procedures for its reviews, strikes expert and advisory panels, and undertakes any related research.

Practical application
Integral hands-on practical experience within a course applying theoretical knowledge in a working facility with specialized equipment and/or supplies.

Practical experience
Program component designed to meet those particular program learning outcomes which require hands-on application of theoretical knowledge beyond the capacity of the typical college classroom or laboratory.

Prerequisite
Course(s) that must be completed in a prior term in order for students to register and be successful in the subsequent course; used only when the learning in one course facilitates the learning in the other.

Prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR)
A process which uses a variety of tools to help learners reflect on, identify, articulate and demonstrate past learning which has been acquired through study, work and other life experiences and which is not recognized through formal transfer of credit. PLAR allows the evaluation of past learning against established academic standard so that credit can be awarded by a credentialing body. The PLAR system evaluates prior learning and relates it to existing courses, through portfolio assessment and challenge evaluation, for the purpose of granting college credit. See also Credit Transfer Centre.

Program
A group of courses which lead to a diploma, certificate, degree, or other document awarded by the Board of Governors.

Program Advisory Committee (PAC)
Group of stakeholders and affiliate members who provide guidance and advice to the Program Team to guide our curriculum content and industry partnerships, ensuring relevance and responsiveness of each program.

Program assessment
Supports Georgian’s committment to delivering relevant programs of exceptional qulaity by providing the college with a comprehensive data tool and process to support assessment of and planning for academic programs. Includes a comprehensive set of quality criteria, performance data/benchmarks for academic programs as well as timely, accurate and accessible reporting tools. Engages program areas in reviewing results and planning for continuous improvement.

Program description
Component of the program outline, provides a concise general description of learning goals and philosophy of the program (values and beliefs about the learner and the learning process in this program). May include reference to the industry, professional field and the broader community. Maximum 150 words or 900 characters.

Program funding units (for funding purposes)
This is a measure of the duration of the program. A typical business program has 1.0 funding units for each full year of duration and all other programs are measured relative to the business program.  All programs in an MTCU code have the same funding unit.

Program guide
Annual publication of the definitive descriptions of program requirements for students; produced in alignment with the admissions cycle.

Program learning outcomes (PLOs) – Certificate and Diplomas
Required in certificate and diploma programs, vocational in nature and taken from the Provincial Program Standards or Provincial Program Descriptions Vocational Learning Outcomes (VLOs) and Essential Employability Skills (EES). They are statements that indicate what a graduate of the program is able to do in the workplace, and are attainable and measurable, and indicative of the level of skill appropriate to the credential. Appear on program outlines.

Program learning outcomes (PLOs) – Degree
Required in degree programs, PLOs identify what students should know, value or be able to accomplish after successfully completing their pgoram. These outcomes are achieved through specific learning activities, which are integrated at the course-level and build toward overall program-level learning. Appear on program outlines.

Program level
Two digit code representing the credential level of the program: AP – Apprentice, PG – Post-Graduate (Graduate Certificate), PS – Post Secondary (college certificate, diploma, advanced diploma), UG – Undergraduate degree studies, UP – Upgrading (AACE only), UY – University Collaboration with York (BSCN only).

Program outline
Official college document containing detailed information about a program, useful to prospective applicants and posted online.

Program progression
Association of the calendar term to the academic term progression, including practical experience term (e.g. co-op, internship) of a program. Appears on program outlines.

Program renewal
Five year review cycle for all Ministry approved programs. Ensures that all programs meet current MTCU standards, as well as legislative requirements.

Program standard
Ministry directed program standards apply to all similar programs of instruction offered by colleges across the province. Each program standard for a postsecondary program of instruction includes the following elements: vocational standards (the vocationally specific learning outcomes which apply to the program in question), essential employability skills (the essential employability skills learning outcomes which apply to all programs of instruction), and general education requirements (the requirement for general education in postsecondary programs of instruction).

Program status
Reflects operating status of programs: approved, active, pending, canceled, dormant or suspended.

Program team
Group concerned with program and delivery needs; may include faculty, co-op consultants, part-time studies managers, counselors, librarians, academic administration and support staff.

Program weight (for funding purposes)
This is a measure of the special expenses that the program requires (such as specialized equipment or additional staff resources). A typical business program has a program weight of 1.0 and all other programs are measured relative to the business program. All programs in an MTCU code have the same weight.

Program Weighted Average (PWA)
Used to determine eligibility to graduate; PWA is the sum of all weighted course grades divided by the sum of all course hours for all semesters.

Projected enrolments
Estimate of student numbers for an academic year, all academic levels of programs.

Provincial program description
Ministry document containing a brief description of the program as well as vocational learning outcomes. Used as a reference when Minsitry program standards do not exist for a program. Not to be confused with the program description that appears as a component of the program outline (see Program description above).

R

Recognition of Achievement program
Comprised of non-credit, non-funded courses; typically do not have any formal admission requirements. Students successfully completing their program of study are awarded a Recognition of Achievement from Georgian.

Required learning resources
Materials a student is expected to have readily available for regular use in learning activities; may include texts, tools, uniform, learning guides, software, audio-visual material, etc.

Research Ethics Board
Georgian College supports research that enhances curriculum development and renewal, creates learning for our staff and students, and may generate revenue/resources for the college. The Georgian College Research Ethics Board (REB) serves to approve proposed or ongoing research involving human subjects that is conducted within or by members of Georgian College.

Residency
The minimum number of credits (or length of time) that must be taken through courses under the direct supervision of faculty of the credential-issuing college. The courses must be different than those already taken for credit toward previous certification. Georgian’s residency requirements can be found in the academic policies.

S

Schedule Type
A component of the course outline defining how the course will be delivered (online, in class, video-conference, etc.).

Scheduling
Registrar’s Office activity which creates student, teacher and room timetables for courses delivered in a term.

Section
Used during scheduling to distinguish multiple offerings of the same course; has a unique course registration number (CRN) which is used in the registration process.

Senior Leadership Team (SLT)
The senior leadership team consists of the college’s President, Vice Presidents, and the senior administrators who report directly to the President.

Semester weighted average
Used to determine promotional status from term to term; refer to academic policies for details on calculating weighted averages.

Small group tutorial
Instruction that must occur in small group settings (usually 5 – 10 students) and in which individual students do not require access to equipment except where computer labs are used for standard packages, or where labs and workshops are used for convenience.

Sponsor
A third party organization that pays any part of a student’s fees.

Standard Workload Form (SWF)
The contractual tool for faculty work assignment.

Steering Committee
Committee that guides the direction of a project or initiative.

Subject code
Subject area identifier for courses; represented by 4 place alpha prefix within the course code; relates to the subject matter of the course, not the program.

Substituted course
College course which is used to replace a credential requirement. This is used by exception and requires Registrar/Dean approval.

Suspended program
A program status in which a program into which a college has decided not to admit first-year or beginning level students.

Syllabus
A required supplement to a course outline summarizing topics to be covered and setting forth in specific detail the teacher’s expectations for the students enrolled in the section of the course.

T

Term
The period of time (Fall, Winter, Summer) in which academic activity takes place, e.g. when a course is delivered.

Terminated course
A course status in which a course(s) has been replaced or retired.

Term Weighted Average (TWA)
Used to determine promotional status from term to term; TWA is the sum of all weighted course grades divided by the sum of all course hours.

Testamur
A credential awarded by an educational institution that testifies that the recipient has successfully completed a particular program of study, common term used at the degree level.

Tri-council Agencies
The Tri-Council Agencies, made up of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), are a major source of research funding for post-secondary institutions in Canada. Also see Tri-Agency Financial Administration Guide.

Transcript
Official academic record sent from one institution to another without student intervention; normally includes all academic work completed at an institution.

V

Vocational learning outcomes (VLOs)
Vocationally specific statements that describe what learners will know and be able to do when they graduate from a program. They are linked to the credential framework and program standards set by the provincial Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development.

W

Wait list
Qualified applicants may be placed on a wait list if the program they’ve applied to has reached its maximum enrolment limit. Applicants will be advised if a seat becomes available at a later date.

Weighted grade
Multiplying the final course grade by the course hours to give the weighted grade; for further information refer to academic policies.

Work integrated learning (WIL)
A structured work experience that is an official component of the program and is reported to the Ministry. A program may have multiple types of structured work experiences and may be included in order to meet the requirements of a professional or occupational regulatory body when licensing or registration by the body is required to practice the occupation.

Work placement
One of the several practical experience components of Georgian College programs; specifically, an opportunity for exposure to some or all the job tasks or skills associated with the program of study.