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Faculty PD

Our ability to learn never ends

Georgian’s faculty professional development (PD) opportunities include a range of workshops, series, webinars and drop-in sessions to help faculty build key strengths and to continue to expand and grow as teachers in their practice. The Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) invites you to sign up for a workshop or drop in to a session. We’re here to help and we always love to hear from you!

CTL workshops

This calendar is for reference only.

Please note, for the time being all workshops will be delivered virtually through Microsoft Teams or WebEx unless otherwise noted. 

Many of the sessions listed will be drop-in workshops and with no registration is required. If you would like to attend a series workshop (multiple dates), please visit Saba TalentSpace found in the employee training section of the employee portal to register. Sign up for workshops is necessary to ensure you receive important communications about your workshops.

If you have difficulty registering or locating a workshop in the Saba TalentSpace system, please contact Debora Moore.

Pathways document

Faculty Learning Community (FLC)

Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) are structured learning communities of faculty and staff at Georgian intended to build connections, engage is scholarly conversations and develop a scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL).  FLC’s are considered high-impact practices that foster culture change among faculty. At the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL), FLCs have focused their discussions and projects on learning about and experimenting with evidence-based teaching practices

DistractedGeorgian College Chevron
Image of line paper with pen scribbled on it. Text reads, Distracted - why students can't focus and what you can do about it - James M. Lang

About

The Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) would like to invite you to participate in a Faculty Learning Community based on the book, Distracted, by James Lang.

Getting students to pay attention has always been a challenge and remote teaching has really highlighted this issue for postsecondary teachers. In a 2020 survey by Georgian College, the top student issue was focusing or paying attention to remote teaching. Previously, we might have suggested access to technology has ruined students’ ability to focus yet, as we enter into our new reality of post pandemic teaching, we can realize technology is not the issue. We need to consider good pedagogical design and practices to support student learning.

In his new book, James Lang argues the solution to an inability of students to focus is actually a deeper problem:  how we teach is often at odds with how students learn. How we organize our learning spaces is more designed to force students into long periods of intense focus, but emerging science reveals that the brain is wired for distraction.  Students learn best when able to actively seek and synthesize new information.

Through the FLC, we will explore how we can structure our learning spaces more as a place to cultivate students’ attention. The book offers lots of ideas grounded in research and helps us think more about how to support student learning.

Facilitator: Kelly Fox

Anyone is welcome to join. The FLC is free. However, you must either acquire the book for yourself or get online access via the Georgian library.

How will this book club work?

We will meet virtually, over the course of five weeks.

graphic of laptop open with world on screen
  • Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2 to 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2 to 3 p.m.

We encourage faculty to be available and committed to all five weeks. We will only read select chapters over the course of five weeks. We want this FLC to be as easy and stress-free as possible for you. We recognize the ongoing requests on faculty time and workload and that we are all likely running with a less-than-a-full tank. We encourage those who are interested to enrol and take part in a way that makes sense for you and as your schedule allows. So, if you didn’t get to the reading, you can still show up. If life gets in the way of some of participating or reading, please attend those you can! If what you need is to have your camera and mic off and just listen in – no worries, and no apologies needed!

 Please register via Halogen before Sept. 2.

UngradingGeorgian College Chevron
Front Cover of book entitled "Ungrading: Why rating students undermines learning (and What to Do Instead)"

Does grading affect learning?

Are there potentially better ways to engage and motivate the learner?

Join us as we explore the new book, Ungrading: Why rating students undermines learning (and what to do instead) by Susan Blum. The book is authored by fifteen educators from different areas of education like humanities, social sciences and STEM and they share their diverse experiences of going gradeless. The book explores how ungrading can actually help student focus more on learning. We will unpack how grades intersect with motivation and learning and explore a variety of assessment and evaluation approaches.

Facilitators: Iain Robertson, Kelly Fox

Anyone is welcome to join.  The FLC is free.  However, you must either acquire the book for yourself or get online access via the Georgian library.

How will this book club work?

We will meet virtually, every two weeks for four weeks starting Wednesday, Sept. 14.

graphic of laptop open with world on screen
  • Wednesday, Sept. 14, noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Sept. 28, noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 12, noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 26, noon to 1 p.m.

We encourage faculty to be available and committed to all four weeks. We will only read select chapters over the course of four weeks.  We want this FLC to be as easy and stress-free as possible for you. We recognize the ongoing requests on faculty time and workload and that we are all likely running with a less-than-a-full tank. We encourage those who are interested to enrol and take part as in a way that makes sense for you and as your schedule allows. So, if you didn’t get to the reading, you can still show up. If life gets in the way of some of participating or reading, please attend those you can! If what you need is to have your camera and mic off and just listen in – no worries, and no apologies needed!

Please register via Halogen before Sept. 2.

Inclusive teachingGeorgian College Chevron
Sathy, V., & Hogan, K. A. (2022). Inclusive teaching: Strategies for promoting equity in the college classroom.

Have you thought about ways to be more inclusive in your teaching practice? Would you be interested in sharing some time with other Faculty to explore strategies for promoting equity in your learning spaces? Please join us for a new FLC where we will discuss and share ideas. Our group will read the new book Inclusive Teaching: Strategies for promoting equity in the college classroom by Hogan and Sathy (2022). This book was written by educators, for educators. The authors provide practical suggestions to enhance your practice.

FLC objectives

  1. Discuss the role of structure in inclusive teaching
  2. Explore strategies to enhance inclusion in your teaching practice
  3. Reflect on your journey as a reflective practitioner

If you are curious, but still not sure, you may like to listen to this podcast from Teaching in Higher Ed with the authors Kelly Hogan and Viji Sathy.

Please come to the FLC as you are. We encourage those who are interested to take part in a way that makes sense for you and as your schedule allows. So, if you did not get to the readings, you can still show up. If life gets in the way of some of the synchronous sessions, please attend those you can! If what you need is to have your camera and mic off and just listen in, no worries, and no apologies needed!

Dates

  • Wednesday, Nov. 2, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 9, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 23, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 30, 3 to 4 p.m.

Registration

**NEW** KEYS to Teaching and Learning

Fall 2022 series

Join CTL’s team of faculty developers on a journey that unlocks the doors of teaching and learning. Through this six-part series, faculty will venture into the exciting worlds of lesson planning, active learning, assessment and evaluation, and personal development. 

Each session is independent and can be taken as a standalone course or as part of the series. (We secretly hope you join us for the series 😊).  

Key 1: Unlocking the door to meaningful teaching and learningGeorgian College Chevron

Postsecondary learners are increasingly diverse and come from a variety of generations, cultural backgrounds and learning experiences. Also, they are at various social, emotional, and developmental stages. With larger and more diverse classes and with multiple types of delivery, it’s becoming more important to connect meaningfully with our students and establish a climate of belonging. Additionally, we need to purposely integrate and apply foundational learning principles in our classes. In this session, participants will explore the impact of these considerations on teaching and learning.

As a participant in this workshop, you will:

  •  interact with teaching peers and begin to develop a learning community;
  •  discuss various characteristics of our students and how this impacts our practice;
  • explore foundational principles of postsecondary teaching; and
  • experience a variety of teaching approaches.

Dates

  • Wednesday, Sept. 28, 10 to 11:30 a.m. (virtual via MS Teams)
  • Thursday, Sept. 29, 1 to 2 p.m. (Barrie Campus, K203)

Registration

Key 2: Unlocking the door to planning for learningGeorgian College Chevron

There are many nuances to course design. Planning your course takes thoughtful reflection and meaningful organization. In this session, we will discuss key principles for designing for engagement, learning and belonging.  

As a participant in this workshop, you will:

  • explore the relationship between programs, courses and planning;
  • consider foundational concepts of universal design for learning (UDL);
  • connect instructional frameworks to teaching; and
  • reflect on the importance of lesson planning.

Dates

  • Wednesday, Oct. 12, 10 to 11:30 a.m. (virtual via MS Teams)
  • Thursday, Oct. 13, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (Barrie Campus, K203)

Registration

Key 3: Unlocking the door to active learningGeorgian College Chevron

Active learning improves student engagement. Student engagement improves learning. It can be energizing and fun! In this session, we will explore and experience active learning strategies. As a participant in this workshop, you will:

  • explore active learning as a teaching and learning strategy;
  • consider the when, how, and why of integrating active learning; and
  • practise active learning strategies.

Dates

  • Wednesday, Nov. 2, 10 to 11:30 a.m. (virtual via MS Teams)
  • Thursday, Nov. 3, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (Barrie Campus, K203)

Registration

Key 4: Unlocking the door to assessment for learningGeorgian College Chevron

Assessment is not just a way to determine if learning has occurred. More importantly, assessment strategies can help students learn and provide direction for your lesson planning. In this session, we will look at how diagnostic, formative and summative assessment weave together to contribute to student success.

As a participant in this workshop, you will:

  • consider the purpose of assessment and draw connections between learning and assessment;
  • explore methods of diagnostic, formative and summative assessment; and
  • highlight the importance of assessment in the process of integrated course design.

Dates

  • Wednesday, Nov. 16, 10 to 11:30 a.m. (virtual via MS Teams)
  • Thursday, Nov. 17, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (Barrie Campus, K203)

Registration

Key 5: Unlocking the door to designing meaningful assignments and testsGeorgian College Chevron

Meaningful assignments provide students with authentic connections to their programs and careers. As experts in your fields, your assessments strategies can help learners build knowledge, skills and achieve course outcomes. In this session, we will explore all things assignment-related.

As a participant in this workshop, you will:

  • reflect on key elements of assignment and test design;
  • explore the difference between novices and experts; and
  • discuss ways to improve assignment design and incorporate universal design.

Dates

  • Wednesday, Nov. 30, 10 to 11:30 a.m. (virtual via MS Teams)
  • Thursday, Dec. 1, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (Barrie Campus K203)

Registration

Key 6: Unlocking the door to continuous growth in faculty competenceGeorgian College Chevron

We improve our teaching by looking back as much as looking forward. Gaining expertise in our teaching takes focus and reflection. In order to improve our practice, we need to consider our own teaching competencies.

As a participant in this workshop, you will:

  • explore teaching competencies;
  • reflect on your teaching goals; and
  • discuss means of collecting feedback on your teaching.

Dates

  • Wednesday, Dec. 7, 10 to 11:30 a.m. (virtual via MS Teams)
  • Thursday, Dec. 8, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (Barrie Campus, K203)

Registration

Old key on white background

Academic integrity professional development

Want to learn more about Academic Integrity? Want to learn in an international community of learners?

The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Manitoba is excited to host the 2022-23 Manitoba Academic Integrity Network (MAIN) Speaker Series, a collection of six professional development opportunities related to academic integrity.

A certificate of completion will be awarded to individuals who register and attend all six sessions in this series. It’s FREE to all Georgian staff and faculty.

Session 1: A restorative justice approach to addressing academic misconductGeorgian College Chevron

Dr. Cath Ellis’ previous roles as Associate Dean (Education) in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Architecture and Associate Dean (Education) in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences have also informed how she approaches serious cases of academic misconduct, such as contract cheating. In a recent Integrity Matters article, Dr. Ellis makes a strong case for the value of perceiving academic misconduct as a mistake, “Of course it’s a serious mistake, but a mistake nonetheless. And educational institutions are in the very business of helping students learn from their mistakes.” In this presentation, she will describe the need for having courageous conversations with students as part of a restorative justice approach to addressing academic misconduct and promoting the values of academic integrity.

Presenter

  • Dr. Cath Ellis, Professor, Faculty of Arts, Design and Architecture, University of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney, Australia

Date

  • Oct. 3

Time

  • 8:30 to 9 a.m. (CST)

Location

  • Virtual via Zoom (please register to receive link)

Registration

Session 2: Academic misconduct – ways to detect it, and the statistical averages of its occurrenceGeorgian College Chevron

Estimating how many students engage in academic misconduct and how frequently they do it, is influenced by numerous aspects of the research methodology. This session will outline what we know about the prevalence and incidence rates of student plagiarism and cheating, factors that are known to affect these rates, and limitations of the research that leaves questions unanswered. Best practices and alternatives to typical methodologies will be outlined. The implications of what we know about rates of academic misconduct for how we detect academic misconduct will be discussed.

Learning outcomes

  1. Understand the types of misconduct students engage in more or less frequently
  2. Identify factors that influence rates of academic misconduct
  3. Explain good practice and limitations in research on academic misconduct prevalence and incidence
  4. Develop situationally-appropriate misconduct detection approaches.     

Presenter

  • Dr. Guy Curtis, Senior Lecturer, Applied Psychology, University of Western Australia

Date

  • Oct. 13

Time

  • 9 to 9:55 a.m. (CST)

Location

  • Virtual via Zoom (please register to receive link)

Registration

Session 3: Positive interventions in the age of contract cheatingGeorgian College Chevron

Join Dr. Thomas Lancaster as he considers what can be done about contract cheating, the behaviour where a student pays or uses a third party to complete their assessed work for them. Find out more about why contract cheating is a problem, why students are at risk, how educators are reconsidering their choice of assessments and how students can themselves help provide solutions. Time will be available for discussion and for attendees to share the positive interventions they have themselves used to address contract cheating.

Learning outcomes

  1. Describe what contract cheating is and how this can pose a problem across a range of academic disciplines
  2. Compare a range of approaches to assessment design that can be used to engage students and make contract cheating less valuable to them
  3. Identify ways to work alongside student as academic integrity partners and address contract cheating as a wider community

Presenter

  • Dr. Thomas Lancaster, Senior Teaching Fellow, Computing, Imperial College London, UK

Date

  • Oct. 20

Time

  • 10 to 10:55 a.m. (CST)

Location

  • Virtual via Zoom (please register to receive link)

Registration

Session 4: Contract cheating: Does stress matter?Georgian College Chevron

Contract cheating is a form of violation behaviour that is on the rise in postsecondary institutions. Join us as we share results from a self-report survey at a Canadian college that explored the prevalence and nature of student engagement in contract cheating and stress learners experienced while completing their programs. We discuss how investigating stress and contract cheating may be used to inform academic integrity policy, procedure, and the supports we provide to students.

Learning outcomes

  1. Discuss the prevalence of commercial contract cheating and sharing behaviour
  2. Identify the types of behaviours learners most often engage in
  3. Describe how learners who engage in contract cheating experience stress
  4. Explain how research on stress and contract cheating can inform academic integrity policy, procedure and supports

Presenters

  • Corrine Ferguson, Instructor, Social Sciences and Humanities, Bow Valley College, Alberta, Canada
  • Dr. Margaret Toye, Associate Dean, School of Community Studies, Human Services and Social Sciences, Bow Valley College, Alberta, Canada

Date

  • Nov. 25

Time

  • Noon to 12:55 p.m. (CST)

Location

  • Virtual via Zoom (please register to receive link)

Registration

Session 5: Experiential learning and academic integrityGeorgian College Chevron

Integrity through experience: Fostering a culture of academic integrity through an experiential learning approach.

Experiential learning is a pedagogical approach used to bridge discipline-specific learning with the world at large. A common goal when adopting experiential learning is to support a culture of integrity within the current course of study. This goal often stretches to include the aim of transferring integrity-based actions into future academic study, workplaces and community organizations. This session looks at the connections and possibilities in intentionally designing integrity into experiential learning activities and courses.

Learning outcomes

  1. Examine connections between the values underlying academic integrity and experiential learning
  2. Consider common assumptions about academic integrity and its place in course learning outcomes and assessments
  3. Explore strategies to intentionally develop academic integrity through an experiential learning approach

Presenter

  • Rebecca Brooks, MEd, Faculty Specialist: Experiential Learning, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

Date

  • Feb. 22, 2023

Time

  • 10 to 10:55 a.m. (CST)

Location

  • Virtual via Zoom (please register to receive link)

Registration

Session 6: Academic integrity as congruence: A panel session on the potential in shared valuesGeorgian College Chevron

Most postsecondary institutions in Canada have an academic integrity policy of some type. An increasing number of these institutions list the fundamental values of academic Integrity (i.e. courage, honesty, trust, respect, fairness, and responsibility) as defined by the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI, 2021) in their policies. In this moderated and interactive session, panelists will share their perspectives of these values and how academic integrity can be viewed as an opportunity for building inclusion in positive and proactive ways.

Panelists

  • Marcos Cunha Cordeiro, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Robin Attas, Educational Developer: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba
  • Claudius Soodeen, Faculty Development Consultant, Centre for Learning & Program Excellence, RRC Polytechnic
  • Michael Cameron, Dean, Community Development, Assiniboine Community College

Date

  • March 8, 2023

Time

  • 10 to10:55 a.m. (CST)

Location

  • Virtual via Zoom (please register to receive link)

Registration

Academic Integrity diagram, trust, fairness, honesty, respect, responsibility

Teaching HOW2s

Where do you look for ideas and inspiration to engage student in learning?  What barriers or challenges keep you from experimenting with new strategies? The Teaching HOW2s is a platform available only to Georgian faculty that offers 140 strategies for a face-to-face or virtual classroom. It also offers a chance to connect with other teachers interested or already using different strategies. It is available 24 hours a day, whenever and wherever you are. Whether you are looking for inspiration or to solve a learning challenge within a course, the HOW2s can help.

In this three-week virtual course, you will:

  • explore the HOW2 platform and resources
  • participate in a HOW2 community of users
  • experiment with retrieving and using a new active learning strategy
  • modify an existing teaching strategy to work within a new modality

Want to learn more? Check out this website: TeachingHOW2s.

Dates

Session 1

  • Monday, Oct. 3, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Monday, Oct. 10, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Monday, Oct. 17, 3 to 4 p.m.

Session 2

  • Wednesday, Nov. 16, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 23, 3 to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Nov. 30, 3 to 4 p.m.

Registration

how2 logo

Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW)

CTL offers an opportunity for faculty to participate in a four-day day workshop within a small group setting designed to enhance your teaching and learning practice.  The Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) was developed by a group of passionate educators over 30 years ago. It is an intensive 30-hour event that uses a “laboratory approach” to focus on the development of instructional skills and has been described as a “transformational experience” whether you have been teaching for one year or 20 years

The ISW is a collaboration between facilitators and participants, which is grounded in active, experiential learning and based on principles of learning-centred instruction. While facilitators have had training in the ISW facilitation process, they are faculty, just like participants.

The ISW requires a significant investment of time, energy and resources from the college and all participants. A commitment to all four days is required. ISW is a fully onsite, face-to-face workshop that follows current college COVID-19 protocols.

Next class will begin in spring 2023. Stay tuned for registration!

TestimonialsGeorgian College Chevron
photo of Andrea Lovering

[ISW] was a wonderful experience! Loved making new friends from across the college that I plan to stay in contact with.

– Andrea Lovering, Program Coordinator, Denturism
photo of Fatimah Datoo

So grateful for this opportunity! I thoroughly enjoyed the [ISW] workshop and would highly recommend it to all!

– Fatimah Datoo, Professor, Dental Hygiene
photo of Jennifer Hickey

Connecting with peers from across the Georgian community, in-person learning, many opportunities to practice BOPPS, a safe space to creatively explore and push our boundaries, lots of constructive feedback and opportunities to practise giving feedback… Oh, and life-long friendships! 🙂

– Jennifer Hickey, Learning and Development
Instructional Skills Workshop logo

One-off workshops

Introduction to PerusallGeorgian College Chevron

About the Introduction to Perusall workshop

Perusall is a free social annotation tool that can be integrated directly into your Blackboard course. You choose a resource, and students add comments and questions throughout, from wherever they are. Students can see their peers’ annotations, and even respond! Early research shows that the use of social annotation tools, like Perusall, can have a positive impact on student attainment of learning outcomes.

In this one-hour session, we’ll take you through the basics of Perusall, including what it is, how to use it, and how to integrate it into Blackboard.

How do I make THAT in H5P?Georgian College Chevron

About the H5P workshop

So, you’ve heard about H5P and maybe seen some examples, but aren’t sure where to start. In this 30-minute session, we’ll walk you through how to create different H5P objects. A different object will be covered each week!