CTLAE workshop calendar at a glance

This calendar is for reference only. If you would like to attend a workshop please visit Halogen to sign up. Sign up for workshops is necessary to ensure you receive important communications about your workshops.

Please note that the workshops are in Barrie unless denoted by a location in brackets before the workshop title (OR – Orillia, VC – Videoconferencing or Synchronous Online). You may use this for planning purposes. To register for workshops, please go to the Employee Training (intranet) page. Please email Greg Rodrigo if you have questions. If you have difficulty registering or locating a workshop in the Halogen system, please contact us.

Pathways for continuous professional learning

Pathways for Continuous Professional Learning related to Teaching Practice

Workshop descriptions

In this two-hour workshop, there will be discussion around how the study – Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education –  (supported by the American Association of Higher Education) can be applied to online teaching and learning.

Assignments should respond to an objective and help learners build knowledge and skills, which rings true for both in-class courses and online courses. This session examines resources and strategies for designing or evaluating online assignments, as well as taking some time to examine tools in Blackboard that can be used to create and manage assignments.

Faculty will learn to utilize three different reading strategies in lectures to help students process textbook information. For more information about these sessions, please contact:

Faculty will learn to implement three notetaking systems in lectures to help focus student attention and facilitate student learning. For more information about these sessions, please contact:

Faculty will learn to implement three studying and test-taking strategies to help students study meaningfully and productively. For more information about these sessions, please contact:

Additional descriptions are currently under development. Please visit the CTLAE workshop registration tab above to view our current and upcoming offerings or contact Deb Moore for further information.

Educational technology workshop descriptions

Educational technology workshops are ongoing and offered each semester. If you have questions or need additional information, please email:

This introductory, hands-on workshop helps participants become familiar with the Blackboard course environment. Areas of focus include:

  • Making courses available
  • Creating announcements
  • Emailing students from within Blackboard
  • Posting documents

Everyone welcome. No prior experience with Blackboard required.

This session provides faculty with hands-on experience creating “Assignment” items within Blackboard that enable students to submit their assignments electronically. Faculty will be provided with the opportunity to create an “Assignment” item and to view and grade a student submission via Blackboard Grade Center (time permitting).

This hands-on workshop offers an overview of each tool and how it can be used in the classroom. Areas of focus include:

  • Creating the items
  • Setting up links to enable student participation
  • Grading student submissions
  • How those marks link into the Blackboard Grade Center

This session offers participants the opportunity to explore the many ways Blackboard can be used to facilitate group work during or outside of class time.

This hands-on session introduces participants to the Blackboard rubric builder. Participants will learn:

  • How to set up the rubric builder to suit their needs
  • How to transpose a paper-based rubric into digital format to use for grading electronic assignments
  • How to digitize a rubric to streamline the grading process

Participants are encouraged to bring their own rubrics in Word format on a USB stick to work with during the session.

This session helps participants set up and prepare the Blackboard Grade Center for courses. Participants will learn:

  • How to create and organize columns
  • How to setup the weighted total column
  • How to streamline the grading process for digital assignment submissions

This session guides faculty through the process required to backup and save a course for future use. Participants should bring a USB stick to this session.

Student response technology is an effective tool to facilitate pedagogical best practices and enhance student learning. Turning Technologies clicker software integrates seamlessly with PowerPoint and has some powerful reporting features. This workshop familiarizes participants with the Turning Point software, creating basic PowerPoint polls to engage students in class, as well as run a Turning Point session to record student responses.

For more information about using ResponseWare or the sign out process, please visit the ResponseWare page on the college intranet.

Remark training is available upon request. Please visit the Remark page on the college intranet for more information.

Series descriptions

The workshops listed below are CTLAE multi-part series and are generally offered as two-hour sessions once per week over the course of four to five weeks. Please note that many of the series require attendance to the first session in the series to attend subsequent sessions.

This series of workshops offers faculty opportunities to connect with other teachers and increase skills and knowledge related to postsecondary teaching and learning.

Goals for the sessions

Through participation in these sessions, part-time faculty will have the opportunity to:

  • Examine and apply principles of teaching and learning;
  • Share ideas and strategies across disciplines;
  • Interact with peers to discuss teaching practice;
  • Gain information on support resources for teaching; and,
  • Connect with the Georgian College community.

NOTE: It is recommend that participants commit to the whole series. Parts one through four are foundational to the subsequent sessions.

  • Part 1: Postsecondary Teaching and Learning
  • Part 2: Planning Instruction (online module available)
  • Part 3: Active Learning Strategies
  • Part 4: Intro to Postsecondary Assessment  (online module available)
  • Part 5: Designing Meaningful Assignments  (online module available)
  • Part 6: Faculty Evaluations and Continuous Growth
  • Part 7: Understanding and Applying Academic Policies and Procedures (online module only)
  • Part 8: Integrating Technology into Teaching

See calendar for dates and times. For more information, contact Greg Rodrigo at ext. 1775.

In this six-part series, faculty will explore interests, perceptions and ideas related to online teaching and learning with their peers. To kick off this series, key pedagogical skills and attitudes needed to teach effectively online will be discussed. As a group, participants will review the shifts in thinking and the role as teacher when moving from face-to-face to online delivery. Once the group has examined these crucial concepts, they will explore specific approaches to developing and teaching online.

Pre-requisites: Faculty registering for this series must have completed prior learning on the basics of lesson planning, postsecondary assessment, and assignment design. Sessions offered through CTLAE on these topics or equivalent are acceptable.

NOTE: Faculty must participate in Part 1 to participate in any of the other sessions.

  • Part 1: So You’re Thinking about Developing an Online Course?
  • Part 2: Learning Theories and Teaching Online
  • Part 3: Online Course Design: An Overview
  • Part 4: Online Assignment Design
  • Part 5: Design for Online Tools
  • Part 6: Blackboard Tools for Online Learning

For more information, contact Amy Goruk at ext. 1075.

If you have ever tried to create a test within Blackboard you know it can sometimes be a confusing task. This three-part series guides faculty through the basic test creation process using the most logical setup methods, as well as save all of the hard work that goes into creating tests so they may be used again in the future.

Please register for each session individually.

  • Part 1: Create and Deploy a Test
  • Part 2: Create Pools of Questions to Generate Randomized Tests – Export Tests and Pools to Save and Share
  • Part 3: Create a Pool of Questions using Respondus

For more information about the Blackboard Testing Series, please email facultybbsupport@georgiancollege.ca.

In this five-part series, participants investigate what blended learning is and how to plan for assessments and interactions in this new format. Once the group has examined these crucial concepts, they will develop methods for quality assurance within the blended format. Upon completion, faculty should have several course artifacts created, as well as an understanding of the pedagogy behind this teaching medium.

Pre-requisites: Faculty registering for this series must complete prior learning on the basics of lesson planning, postsecondary assessment and assignment design. Sessions offered through CTLAE on these topics or equivalent are acceptable.

NOTE: Faculty must participate in Part 1 to participate in any subsequent sessions. This series will be offered in a blended format consisting of the following workshops:

  • Part 1: Understanding Blended Learning
  • Part 2: Blended Interactions
  • Part 3: Blended Assessments of Learning
  • Part 4: Blended Content and Assignments
  • Part 5: Quality Assurance

For more information, contact Amy Goruk at ext. 1075.

Essential Employability Skills (EES) are skills needed in nearly every workplace at a variety of complexities and are essential to getting a job and staying in the workplace. The Conference Board of Canada has identified several skills that employers feel are critical. These include: communicating, managing information, working with others, problem-solving, learning continuously (http://www.conferenceboard.ca/Libraries/EDUC_PUBLIC/esp2000.sflb).

This workshop moves teaching beyond content and examines how to teach these skills. Programs are expected to include EES skills into the curriculum, but what are they and how can you integrate EES with subject-specific content? This six part series examines:

  • How EES align with course goals;
  • What’s involved in facilitating EES learning; and,
  • Eelements of design required to intentionally support student learning and development.

Pre-requisites: Faculty must complete prior learning on the basics of lesson planning, postsecondary assessment and assignment design. Sessions offered through the CTLAE on these topics or equivalent are acceptable.

NOTE: Faculty must participate in Part 1 to participate in any subsequent sessions.

For more information, contact Kelly Mannen  at ext. 1092.

The Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities (MTCU) requires programs to integrate EES knowledge and skills throughout all curriculum components. Program areas need to show how EES align with course goals, consider what is involved in facilitating EES learning and consider elements of design required to intentionally support student learning and development (http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/pepg/audiences/colleges/progstan/essential.html).

In this four-part series, faculty examine the four components that contribute to effective group projects: task, team development, assessment and group process. Participants will discuss challenges in each of these areas and consider how they can be addressed through learning design.

Pre-requisites: Faculty registering for this series must complete the following prior learning: Introduction to Postsecondary Assessment, Designing Meaningful Assignments and Collaborative Learning. Sessions offered through CTLAE on these topics or equivalent are acceptable.

NOTE: Faculty must participate in Part 1 to continue with subsequent sessions.

  • Part 1: Designing Meaningful and Authentic Tasks – Part 1 is mandatory.

**Registration for Parts 2 to 4 take place during the Part 1 session.

  • Part 2: Structuring and Supporting Team Development
  • Part 3: Designing Assessments for Group Projects
  • Part 4: Scaffolding for Productive Group Process

For more information, contact Annique Boelryk  at ext. 1151.

In this five-part series, faculty expand their understanding of diverse college learners and the implications for classroom learning.

NOTE: Faculty must participate in Part 1 to participate in any of the other sessions.

  • Part 1: Diversity and the Inclusive Classroom
  • Part 2: Student Development and Learning
  • Part 3: Teaching Across the Generations
  • Part 4: Emotions in the Classroom
  • Part 5: Motivation Theories and Student Learning

For more information, contact Annique Boelryk at ext. 1151.

The Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) was developed by a group of passionate educators over 25 years ago. It is an intensive 30-hour event that uses a “laboratory approach” to focus on the development of instructional skills and has been described as a “transformational experience” whether you have been teaching for one year or 20 years.

The ISW is a collaboration between facilitators and participants, which is grounded in active, experiential learning and based on principles of learning-centred instruction. While facilitators have had training in the ISW facilitation process, they are faculty, just like the participants.

For more information, view the ISW promotional flyer (PDF). For details, contact Greg Rodrigo at ext 1775.

Please note: There is an application process associated with this workshop series.

The ISW requires a significant investment of time, energy and resources both for the college and for all participants. At this point, the ISW program can only be offered to 10 participants each year. For these reasons, we ask all interested faculty to submit an application. Based on the application form and a follow-up conversation, priority will be given using the following criteria:

  • Full-time faculty applicants will have priority, and then part-time faculty who have completed other professional development sessions related to teaching and learning.
  • Applicants whose professional development goals are most closely aligned with the goals the ISW will have priority

If you are interested in participating, please complete this online application form.

Description currently under development. For more information, contact Annique Boelryk at ext. 1151.

This program is offered to all faculty hired into a full-time faculty position. Faculty are given a teaching download to allow them time to participate in this program. The program connects faculty with the college community, engages participants in dialogue and reflection on teaching practices, college-wide processes, professional development and links faculty with the available college services and supports.

For more information, contact Greg Rodrigo at ext. 1775.

The resources you will receive are designed to help you develop the skills and abilities required to design and build an online course, as well as manage the course during delivery.

Over the next 14 weeks, you will learn about online course design and build your own course. There are other faculty members also designing courses this semester and you will have the opportunity to interact with them in person and in the online Blackboard course shell. This provides you with some vital Blackboard experience from the point of view of a student.

OCDP goals:

  1. Apply the principles of instructional design to the development of an online course so that students successfully achieve learning objectives,
  2. Use Blackboard tools effectively in both the development and running of an online course,
  3. Complete the development of an online course that is ready for beta-testing & delivery.

For additional information about the OCDP please contact Amy Goruk at ext. 1075.

Duration: 6 weeks
Time/Location:
Completely online, participants will have readings and activities to complete each week but will not meet at one set time or place.

This 6 week, fully asynchronous online, facilitator led series has been designed for full and non-full time faculty who are interested in teaching online/hybrid OR who are interested in improving or modifying an existing online or hybrid course.  The development of instruction and multimedia will be incorporated throughout this series.

Please note!  This series does not walk you through the design and development of a new hybrid/online course rather the modification and improvements of an existing course.

Faculty will have weekly assignments, tasks, and readings in a Blackboard shell where they are assigned a student role.  They will also have practical hands on experiences in Blackboard in the teacher role.

  • Part 1: An overview of online teaching
  • Part 2: Your role as an online teacher
  • Part 3: Adding materials to your online course
  • Part 4: Preparing to teach your online course
  • Part 5: What to do during the semester
  • Part 6: Best Practices and wrap up

Any questions please contact Amy Goruk

Registration now available through Halogen!  Any questions on how to register please contact Debora Moore

Description is currently under development. Please contact Kelly Mannen at ext. 1092 for further information.

What is a faculty learning community (FLC)?

FLCs are cross-disciplinary groups of faculty engaged in an ongoing dialogue around a common teaching interest. A book forms the basis of these discussions and communities meet several times throughout a given semester (every two to three weeks depending on the group).

Through participation in a learning community, faculty will have the opportunity to:

  • Meet with the same group of people over a semester around a common teaching interest
  • Engage in conversation and sharing with faculty from other program areas
  • Cultivate a sense of community based on discussions of teaching practice

Books that have formed the basis of faculty learning communities since they began in 2009 are as follows:

  • Collaborative Learning Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty (2005). Jossey-Bass. By: Barkley, E.F. Cross, K.P., & Major, C.H.
  • Using Experiential Learning in the Classroom: Practical Ideas for All Educators. (2005). Scarecrow Publishers. By: Wurdinger, S.D.
  • Educating the Net Generation. (2006). Educause. By: Oblinger, D.G. & Oblinger, J.L. (Eds.)
  • The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life. (1998, 2007). Jossey-Bass. By: Palmer, P.
  • Creating Significant Learning Experiences: an Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses. (2003) Jossey-Bass. By: Fink, L.D.
  • Thinking about Teaching and Learning: Developing Habits of Learning with First Year College and University Students (1999). Stylus. By: Leamnson, R.

Online modules

The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence (CTLAE) offers select workshops online. The sessions below will count towards the Teaching Practice Credential. The Teaching Practice Credential is a credential offered by CTLAE to recognize faculty involvement in professional development activities related to teaching practice.

Instructions

These online learning modules are available to those who want to use the content. If you are a Georgian College employee and you would like to use this towards your Teaching Practice Credential, please connect with the appropriate CTLAE representative outlined for each module. You must contact the CTLAE to be added to the corresponding Blackboard course to begin your module.

Please contact Amy Goruk at ext. 1075 to obtain access to the Blackboard course associated with this module.

Learning objective(s)

Upon successful completion of this unit of instruction, learners will be able to:

  • Consider learners and learning needs as you plan instruction;
  • Use principles of learning to inform instructional planning; and,
  • Plan a lesson based on instructional frameworks.

Link to content: Planning Instruction (please bookmark this link).

Please contact Amy Goruk at ext. 1075 to obtain access to the Blackboard course associated with this module.

Learning objective(s)

Upon successful completion of this unit of instruction, learners will be able to:

  • Identify various influences on approaches to assessment;
  • Identify challenges and questions regarding assessment;
  • Reflect on assessment practices using learning theories and principles; and,
  • Apply learning design to assessment.

Link to Content: Introduction to Assessment (please bookmark this link).

In-Services Teacher Training Certification

Georgian College equivalency for In-Service Teacher Training Certificate program

Faculty members who have previously have been unable to attain the maximum step on the salary scale according to the collective agreement had the option of completing two courses through St. Clair College in the In-Service Teacher Training program.

According to our collective agreement, “Employees who have 15 years or more of service and whose maximum step is currently below the maximum on the salary schedule and who enrol and participate in the program shall receive (once only) a one step salary progression, to a maximum of the salary schedule, and shall maintain that step upon maintaining satisfactory performance in the program.”

OPSEU Local 350 and college management have agreed to provide an opportunity to complete comparable training at Georgian College. While there is a cost to faculty members completing the St. Clair College modules, there is no cost for completing the Georgian equivalency. We also have agreed that faculty who have been full-time with Georgian may begin the process after only FIVE years of service.

There are two components of the equivalency. Faculty members must complete the foundational modules and the advanced modules.

Equivalent to St. Clair College Module 1 Learning Theories and Baseline Assessments – 25-hour module

Part A (10 hours): Faculty members participate in five sessions related to the Foundations of Contemporary PostSecondary Teaching. These include:

  • Postsecondary Learners and Learning
  • Planning Instruction (available online)
  • Intro to Postsecondary Assessment (available online)
  • Designing Assignments
  • Active Learning

Part B (10 hours): Faculty participate in an additional five sessions through the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence related to their goals and interests.

Part C: Faculty complete an online self-assessment related to teaching practice.

There are several online assessment tools to choose from including:

  • Teaching Perspectives Inventory: This inventory is based on the work of Dan Pratt, UBC, and examines the various perspectives that teachers might bring to their role, their content, and their relationship with learners. The following book is available in the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence for those interested in reading more about the five perspectives. Pratt, D. (1998). Five Perspectives on Teaching in Adult and Higher Education. Melbourne, FL: Krieger Publishing.
  • Teaching Goals Inventory: This inventory is based on the work of Angelo and Cross and encourages teachers to think about a variety of possible goals for instruction. The following is book available in the Centre for Teaching and  Learning for those interested in considering a variety of instructional strategies related to each of the goals. Angelo, T.A., & Cross, K.P. (1993). Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers. Jossey-Bass.
  • Grasha-Reichman Teaching Style Inventory: This research-based inventory explores teaching styles from several perspectives.
Equivalent to St. Clair College Module 6 “Content Update and Integration” – 50-hour module

Part A (30 hours): Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW)

The Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) is an intensive four-day workshop designed to promote effective learning design based on a learning-centred approach. It was developed by a group of passionate postsecondary educators over 25 years ago. It uses a “laboratory approach” to focus on the development of learning-centred instructional skills and has been described as a “transformational experience” whether you have been teaching for one year or 20 years.

Part B: (20 hours): Teaching Portfolio

Faculty compile a teaching portfolio that demonstrates an understanding and implementation of a learning-centred pedagogy. This includes artifacts, reflections and evidence of peer dialogue related to their use of the following in their teaching practice:

  • Integrated learning design (alignment of learning goals, teaching and learning activities, and feedback and assessments)
  • Learning-centred approaches (e.g., experiential learning, problem-based learning, inquiry-based learning, service learning)
  • Scaffolding  that provides learning structures and supports which enable greater student success
  • Active learning strategies that are aligned with assessments and course learning outcomes

The portfolio should include multiple artifacts, reflections and notes from peer dialogue related to the instructional artifacts.

  • Instructional artifacts: The portfolio could include artifacts such as lesson plans, instructional materials, examples of learning activities, assignments and sample assessments.
  • Reflections: Reflections of various artifacts would discuss how the artifact supports a learning-centred approach as well as integrated learning design
  • Evidence of peer dialogue: Peer dialogue and feedback is important in learning from and enhancing teaching practice. The portfolio would include documented evidence of peer discussion related to a select number of artifacts. Peer discussions can be with a colleague and/or a faculty member from the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence.

Faculty interested in completing the equivalency modules should have this recorded with their dean who will then report to HR that the faculty member is beginning this process.

Faculty must have five years of full-time teaching experience at Georgian before beginning the program. The program must be completed within three years. Upon completion of the program, faculty members receive a one-step increase and are eligible to progress to the maximum salary step as per the academic collective agreement. Georgian College will recognize the first St. Clair College module as the equivalent of our first module.

Teaching Practice Credential

The Teaching Practice Credential is a credential offered by the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence (CTLAE) to recognize faculty involvement in professional development activities related to teaching practice. It is a local credential and is different from the Teaching and Training Adults Certificate, where participants include both college employees and external community members. For more information on the Teaching and Training Adults Certificate (TATA), visit Georgian’s Part-time Studies page.

Faculty can earn the credential upon completion of the following:

  • Step 1: Participation: Participation in at least 10 PD activities related to teaching practice (all sessions that count towards the credential are marked with “*” ­ in the CTLAE calendar. Faculty must keep a tracking sheet to record the dates that various sessions were attended. Be sure to keep your tracking sheet in a safe place – this is each FACULTY’S RESPONSIBILITY to maintain and will be required upon completion.
  • Step 2: Reflection: 250-word reflection on how your participation and learning in the 10 sessions impacted your teaching practice.
  • Step 3: Submission: Submission to CTLAE; includes tracking sheet and reflection piece.

Further details on the three steps are provided below.

For all faculty, new or seasoned, the credential is one way to demonstrate commitment to professional development in teaching practice. Faculty who participate enjoy the camaraderie, the exposure to new ideas, and the chance to think about various aspects of their teaching practice. We encourage faculty to consider incorporating activities related to the credential as part of their professional development goals.

Faculty who have earned the credential are formally recognized by the college in a number of ways: (1) a letter is written by the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence that can be included in your teaching portfolio and in your HR file; (2) all credentials earned during the academic year are formally presented as part of our spring Focus on Teaching conference.

To recognize ongoing efforts for Professional Development (PD), CTLAE offers an incentive to promote ongoing PD for faculty members who have previously earned the Teaching Practice Credential (TPC). Faculty who have completed the TPC and who attend any four CTLAE sessions through a subsequent academic year, will be recognized for their ongoing PD efforts by receiving a recognition stamp for the TPC certificate. Please submit a list of sessions/dates and a reflective piece on how this PD has impacted your teaching practice. Please contact Annique Boelryk at ext. 1151 for more information.

Step 1: Participation

To complete the credential, you must participate in at least 10 professional development activities related to teaching practice and keep a record of your participation (all sessions that count towards the credential are marked with an (*) ­ in the CTLAE calendar. Important notes:

  • What counts: Sessions based on using teaching tools (e.g., Blackboard, PowerPoint, etc.) do not count towards the credential.
  • Tracking: It is the faculty’s responsibility to accurately track session completion dates. Print out a copy of the tracking sheet and please have the session facilitator initial your attendance. Faculty must keep a tracking sheet to record dates that various sessions were attended.

Step 2: Reflection After completing 10 sessions, you must write a 250 word reflection on how your participation and learning in the 10 sessions had an “Impact on your Teaching Practice”. Your reflective piece should express thoughts on things such as the following:

  • What are some specific things you learned in the sessions that were useful in the development of your teaching practice?
  • How did you apply what you learned to your classes and what was the impact?
  • How has participation in the sessions positively impacted your knowledge, skills, and/or attitudes as an educator?

Step 3: Submission

To complete the process, submit your completed tracking sheet and reflection piece to Annique Boelryk in the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence. Once your submission has been received and reviewed, you will receive a copy of the letter acknowledging completion. The actual credentials are presented annually at our Focus on Teaching Conference.

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